THE HARRISON-PHELAN HOUSE
 
519 West Monroe Street
  Home of Mr. and Mrs. Jan H. Krummrich

   Friday, April 10; 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.
   Sunday, April 12; 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.

 What began as a two-room saddlebag cabin built in the 1830s was remodeled in 1848 to accommodate Doctor Richard Harrison's growing family to the Greek Revival planter's cottage that remains today. A distinguished statesman and jurist, Judge James Phelan lived in the house from 1851 until 1869. He was one of two senators from Mississippi to serve the Confederate government at Richmond, VA. From the classic Greek Revival woodwork in the east formal rooms to the design style of the six original fireplaces, Asher Benjamin influence can be seen throughout the exterior and interior. The two rear rooms facing Frank Street incorporate the original settler's cabin. Carefully furnished with Federal and Classical period antiques and decor, the Harrison-Phelan House presents two historid architectural styles under one roof. A Mississippi Landmark, The Harrison-Phelan is believed to be the oldest standing home in Aberdeen.
  THE MAGNOLIAS
   732 West Commerce Street
   City of Aberdeen

   
Friday, April 10; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 Noon
   Saturday, April 11; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 Noon

The home's legacy began in 1850 when a prominent planter and physician, Doctor William Alfred Sykes, built a townhouse for his wife Rebecca and nine children, using local materials. Sadly, Rebecca died one year after its construction was complete. It is said today that Rebecca still looks over the home and grounds. The Magnolias remained in the Sykes family for generations and changed ownership to Clarence C. Day II, who later deeded it to The City of Aberdeen. Beyond the Doric style columns, original Bohemia Pot Glass accents the front entry. Furnished to the period, The Magnolias boasts an antique Waterford crystal chandelier suspended  above the landing of an impressive mahogany double staircase. Features that are customary at the time of construction include a brick floor cellar that once served as a family dining room, recently restored detached kitchen, old well house and smokehouse. The Magnolias is an excellent example of Greek Revival townhouses built in the Upper Tombigbee Region during the antebellum period.



HOLIDAY HAVEN
609 South Meridian Street
Home of Mr. & Mrs. Tomas E. Seymer

Friday, April 10; 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Saturday, April 11; 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.


Holiday Haven, one of the great mansions of Monroe County, remained in the Holiday family until 1993. A family of substance, the Holidays' home was filled with fine period furniture and art. Many of the pieces remain in the house. This Greek Revival townhouse is remarkable for the meticulous detailing. Splendid gilded valances grace the windows of its formal rooms, amd the "jib" windows that open like doors to the front porch are only a few feature in the house. The present owners have restored the property to its antebellum glory and have included their own collection of antique Sevres and Paris porcelain and fine furniture. The house sits in the midst of beautiful landscaped grounds.
ADAMS-FRENCH HOUSE
301 N. Meridian Street
Home of Mr. John Dwight Stevens

Saturday, April 11; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 Noon
Saturday, April 11; 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Construction of this fine example of a planter's townhouse dates to 1856. It is one of the most important Green-Revival mansions of northeast Mississippi. The Adams-French House was built by Colonel John Cox, a wealthy planter, for his daughter, Mrs. Robert Adams. In 1872, Adams died and his widow later married Dr. Anderson H. French, a prosperous local businessman. The home has served several families over the years. It was also used as the Masonic Lodge from the early to late 1900s. Ravaged by a second floor fire in 2006, this meticulously restored elegant Greek-Revival mansion still towers on the edge of downtown Aberdeen. Recently moved and restored, the historic James Creek M.B. Church stands adjacent to the home. A histori item of special interest is the punka, which hangs over the dining table and was used to move the air and keep flies away from the food. The Adams-French House is steeped in history and the decor and furnishings reflect the luxurious lifestyle of the antebellum upper class.
BELLA VIDA
503 South Franklin Street
Home of Mr. and Mrs. Vince Cole
Friday, April 10; 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, April 11; 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Sunday, April 12; 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.

This Second Empire house is material evidence of Aberdeen's prosperity in the Post Reconstruction Period. A style admired from the 1860s through the 1880s, only four Second Empire style houses remain in Mississippi. Bella Vida was built in 1879  by Joseph Eckford, a local pharmacist. In the late 1880s, George Jabez Leftwich purchased the home. A prominent attorney in Aberdeen, Mr. Leftwich once served the district as a state senator in the Mississippi legislature. In true Second Empire fashion, the two and a half story home boasts a striking three and a half story tower that is on the southeast corner elevation along with a mansard roof sheathed with original slate. Nineteen Italianate vernacular shaped posts support the porch roof and are connected by arched spandrels. A stunning feature of the home is the original red Bohemia Glass inset at the formal parlor fireplace, etched with a Victorian motif. Tradition holds that the glass was ordered from Italy and shipped up the Tombigbee River to Aberdeen. An exceptional architectural piece of history, Bella Vida remains part of Aberdeen's Silk Stocking Row.

PAINTED LADY
404 South Franklin Street
Home of Javier Salazar and Courtney Thompson

Friday, April 10; 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Saturday, April 11; 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Sunday, April 12; 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.

English derived and popular from the 1880s until the 1890s, this Queen Ann style cottage is one of several historic homes that comprise Aberdeen's Silk Stocking Row. In 1885, Ambrose Armstdrong Posey built the house for his first wife, Sarah Jane Morgan. The Poseys were a distinguished pioneer family of Monroe County merchants and farmers. The home remained in the family until the death of Mr. Posey's second wife, Alice Puckett Posey, in 1949. The acroterion, the towers gilded finial, is one of a few to survive in the area. With its asymmetrical facade, highly ornamented tower, gingerbread trim, decorative shingles and gable sunburst motif, the Painted Lady pays tribute to what is also known as America's Victorian Vernacular.



THE SHADOWS
511 South Matubba Street
Home of Mr. & Mrs. Dwayne Carlock


Friday, April 10; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 Noon
Saturday, April 11; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 Noon

The Shadows was built by Dan Irvine Howard and he and his family lived there until 1910 when he moved his family to Virginia. Howard's restless nature caused him to move his family around the country returning now and then to Aberdeen only to leave again. However, in 1918, he returned to Aberdeen and repurchased the house only to sell it to J. A. Fraser of Missouri. The house was sold to various people over the next years which caused it to suffer many indignities. Just before World War II, it was even divided into apartments. The Ted Nickerson family purchased the house in 1992 and found that ceilings had collapsed onto floors and the downstairs had been neglected. They began to renovate the house and were still doing so when his job transferred them to Canada. The present owners purchased the house in 2010 and have done extensive repairs both inside and outside. They have filled the house with turn-of-the century heirlooms, some original to the house and some family ones.
HARRISON-HOWARD
423 South Matubba Street
Home of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Harrison

Friday, April 10; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 Noon
Saturday, April 11; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 Noon

Built in 1925 as a reproduction of an 1851 antebellum house that previously stood on the property, The Harrison-Howard house now stands in its place. The original 8,800 sq. ft. structure was the "Widow Blanchard" home in which she lived alone during the Civil War. After the Civil War, W.H. "Woody" Howard offered to switch homes and he lived there with his wife Minnie Bowen Howard and nine children. He lived there until his death. Prior to World War II, the house was destroyed in a fire and it is said that some of the salvageable materials were used in construction of the new house. Rebuilt on a far less grand style, Dr. Frank Foster Kennedy became the best known owner. To our knowledge, four original Doric columns were carefully restored and now stand proudly at the front exterior showcasing a period appropriate symmetrical facade. Leading to the front entrance, the original brick sidewalk has been uncovered and re-worked. The Harrison-Howard house is wonderful example of a Southern Greek Revival townhouse, newer in construction, but faithful to its predecessor.
ELKIN THEATRE
110 West Commerce Street
Aberdeen Elkin Theatre Association


Friday, April 10; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 Noon
Saturday, April 11; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 Noon

Part of Aberdeen's history, the Art Nouveau style Elkin opened its doors in 1937 with seating for more than 800. Designed by Robert Boller of the Boller Brothers, it was considered one of the finest and best equipped theaters in the South. A group of local citizens purchased the Elkin in 1985 and formed the Aberdeen Elkin Theatre Association. They are responsible for the restoration and preservation. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Elkin remains a part of historic Aberdeen and serves its communitty well.

The Elkin will present two performances of live theatre about life in a small town. Please check tour information for days and times.
 
 
 
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